Saturday, July 27, 2013

Dorian disintegrates

The weather system formally known as Dorian disintegrated Saturday afternoon into what forecasters call a tropical wave, the National Hurricane Center reported.

At 5 p.m. Saturday, wind data from satellites indicate that Dorian is no longer circulating. although the remnants of the system, now with gale-force winds of 40 mph, moving rapidly westward at 24 mph.

Gale-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles north of the center.

The 5 p.m. satellite image:




Friday, July 26, 2013

Tropical Storm Dorian is weakening in the Atlantic as it continues to roll toward the Caribbean.

At 5 p.m. Friday, Dorian was about 1,100 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. It was moving west at 22 mph, the National Hurricane Center said.

The storm is expected continue along that path for the next 48 hours.

Satellite images show that Dorian is disorganized and additional weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours.

Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 70 miles from the center.

The latest forecast track:

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Dorian pushing 60 mph winds toward Caribbean

Tropical Storm Dorian continues to move slowly toward the Caribbean with 60 mph winds extending 60 miles from it's center.

At 5 p.m. EDT, Dorian's center was about 1,600 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands, moving west at about 17 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The storm could strengthen in the next 48 hours as it moves over warmer waters.

It is still too far away from land to trigger any coastal watches or warnings, but the forecast track of the storm could put in north of Puerto Rico by Monday afternoon:



Dorian gaining strength but slowing down

Tropical Storm Dorian is still plodding westward, growing in intensity but slowing its pace across the Atlantic.

At 5 a.m. EDT, Dorian's center was about 700 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph, the National Hurricane Center said. The storm was moving west-northwest at 17 mph and is expected to take a more westerly direction in the next few days.

It is still too far away from land to trigger any coastal watches or warnings. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours.

Tropical storm force winds now extend outward up to 60 miles from the center.

The latest forecast track:


Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Dorian still moving as second system appears

Tropical Storm Dorian is still in the open Atlantic moving west at about 20 mph, the national Hurricane Center reported this afternoon.

At 5 p.m., the center of the storm was about 505 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands, with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph with higher gusts. This general motion is expected to continue during the next couple of days.

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect.

Forecasters say slight weakening is possible Thursday as Dorian moves over cooler water.

Tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles from the center.

The hurricane center is also watching a new low pressure system forming about 500 miles east of Bermuda. Forecasters say the system, which is moving northwest, has only a 20 percent chance of developing into a tropical storm in the next 48 hours.

The latest satellite image:

Dorian is season's fourth named storm

That weather system in the eastern Atlantic has formed into Tropical Storm Dorian.

At 11 a.m. Wednesday, Dorian's center was about 410 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, the National Hurricane Center is reporting. Dorian is moving toward the west-northwest at about 21 mph.

Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph, and extend 45 miles from the center.

The expected track of the storm could take it near Puerto Rico by Monday morning. Forecasters say, however, that while the storm could strengthen today, cooler water in its path should help weaken the storm by Thursday.


The forecast track:


Tuesday, July 23, 2013

System forming quickly in eastern Atlantic

The National Weather Service says a surface low pressure system in the Atlantic off the west coat of Africa has a good chance -- 60  percent -- of becoming a tropical system.

Forecasters say the system, a couple of hundred miles south of the Cape Verde Islands is moving westward at about 10 mph., with well-defined circulation.

The system only needs a small increase in the amount and organization of thunderstorm activity to form a tropical depression, the weather service's 2 p.m. advisory said.

The latest satellite imagery: